This very young rabbit has his eyes open and ears up. If found outside the nest, he is ready to go out on his own, regardless of his small size.

This very young rabbit has his eyes open and ears up. If found outside the nest, he is ready to go out on his own, regardless of his small size.

We provide care for injured and orphaned native wildlife that has been found outdoors by the public. Injured wildlife can be dropped off at the clinic anytime during regular business hours. Orphaned babies should be taken directly the wildlife rehabilitators, if possible.

Not all wildlife needs rescuing! Please call us with questions or see these helpful guides to determine if the animal you have found needs help.

We are sorry, but due to the volume of calls, we do not take after hours emergency calls for wildlife.  All after hours calls should be directed to state and federally licensed wildlife rehabilitators who are trained to provide emergency care and will transport them to the clinic for medical attention.

Please be advised that it is illegal to capture and keep native Indiana wildlife for any reason, other than to rescue and transport them to licensed wildlife rehabilitators.  In general, most wildlife do not make good pets, and some can cause severe injury to would-be rescuers.


These baby birds are still in the nest and are not ready to leave. If the nest can be identified, they can be safely returned. If not, they should be delivered to a licensed rehabilitator.

These baby birds are still in the nest and are not ready to leave. If the nest can be identified, they can be safely returned. If not, they should be delivered to a licensed rehabilitator.

Indiana licensed wildlife rehabilitators:

We work closely with a number of highly skilled wildlife rehabilitators listed here:

Name: For The Birds
Contact: Liz and Chris Hatton
Phone: 317-877-1187
Animals accepted: songbirds and birds of prey only

Contact: Katja Kimball
Phone: 317-263-1131, 317-622-2579
Animals accepted: mammals

Name: Providence Wildlife
Contact: Kristen Heitman
Phone: 317-902-3825
Animals accepted: ducks and geese, mammals
Notes: text only

Additional licensed rehabilitators throughout the state of Indiana can be found here on the Department of Natural Resources website.


Tips for Handling and Transporting Wildlife

Most wildlife species do not tolerate being handled by humans well; some can even die from the stress of just being picked up!

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  • Handle them for as short a time as possible.

  • Place them in escape-proof containers for transport. Cardboard boxes with natural bedding like grass clippings or nesting materials work well. For larger animals, consider using opaque plastic bins or trash cans.

  • Keep them in a quiet, dark place.

  • Do not let children handle them.

  • For orphaned baby mammals, provide gentle supplemental heat like a hot water bottle under a towel or a heating pad on the lowest setting under part of the box.

  • Be sure the box is secured safely for transport. Unconscious animals can wake up during the trip!

Some species can pose dangers to their rescuers. All adult animals and birds of prey should be handled very carefully. Injured adults can be carefully picked up with a shovel or bundled in a large towel and placed in a box or tub. When in doubt, call a wildlife rehabilitator for help!


While we do not charge for care of wildlife, donations are greatly appreciated! Here is our Wildlife Donation Wishlist:

  • Towels, washcloths, blankets and fleeces

  • Paper Towels, Dawn dish soap, bleach

  • Heating pads

  • Food: Powdered goats milk, baby bird handfeeding formula, jars of (human) baby food

  •  Simple monetary contributions - Donate here!